Dit Da Jow and Healing Liniment Available

Pacific Wing Chun has three blends of Dit Da Jow and a Coconut oil based Liniments available for purchase.

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New Batch of Bak Fu Pai with Hawaiian Olena, and Essential Oils is ready. I have 2 oz and 4 oz bottles available. Message me for pricing including shipping. Many thanks to the folks at ‪#‎PlumDragon‬ for their fine products. Peace and much Respect, lrs

The Dit Da Jows are all based with Chinese and Hawaiian Healing herbs then aged over six months for full potency.

Bak Fu Pai Blend

Ho Family with Hawaiian Olena and Awa

Iron Palm Blend

2oz – 15.00

4oz – 25.00

Our Liniment is based with Organic Coconut Oil and Beeswax, Dit Da Jow and other essential oils make this a very effective soothing,  aromatic Liniment

.5oz – 7.00

2.oz – 20.00

Pacific Wing Chun Kung Fu Association

Shipping rates vary within the US.

Contact Sifu Ramirez for details.

8083455540 / wingchun.association@yahoo.com

Dit Da Jow available for purchase from Pacific Wing Chun Kung Fu Association

Dit Da Jow available for purchase from Pacific Wing Chun Kung Fu Association.

Pacific Wing Chun Kung Fu Association

New Batch of Bak Fu Pai Dit Da Jow with Hawaiian Olena, and Essential Oils is ready.

A new Batch of Bak Fu Pai Dit Da Jow with Hawaiian Olena, and Essential Oils is ready. I have 2 oz and 4 oz bottles available. Message me for pricing including shipping. Many thanks to the folks at ‪#‎PlumDragon‬ for their fine products.
Peace and much Respect, lrs

Qi Gong Breathing for Active Recuperation

Qi Gong is an integral part of Wing Chun.  We reap the benefits of it through cultivation of vital energy, and also from the increased effectiveness of our breathing on our physiology.  When we practice Sil Nim Tao, we are training our mind and our bodies, part of which includes the breathing technique.  My Sifu and Sigung both taught me the importance of breathing as one of the two most important things in kung fu, and based on my experiences, they are absolutely correct.  Given two equally matched fighters, the one that can recuperate the fastest through proper breathing technique will likely be the victor.  I share some of my own experiences in the paragraphs below that I feel validate the importance of Qi Gong breathing in your kung fu training.

Part of my own workout at home is to run “suicides” after my Wing Chun practice, which I do two to three times each week, depending on how much class/partner time I’ve had.   “Suicides” are a jogging/sprinting exercise consisting of direction changes at 10, 20 and 30 yards, i.e., up and back to ten yards, up and back to 20 yards, and up and back to 30 yards, followed by a rest interval.  I’ve worked up to doing ten rounds of these, which helps to build both strength and endurance, and to a lesser degree, agility.  During the rest periods, I’ve started to integrate Qi Gong breathing with great results compared to normal breathing.  The clear benefit of Qi Gong breathing based on my experience is decreased recuperation time during the rest periods, to the point where I can actually gage how many breaths it will take to recuperate from a given volume of exercise.

For those that want to know the science behind recovery from an exercise like this, well here it is.  I personally feel that it’s important to understand the science because this knowledge gives you the ability to manipulate it to your own needs.   Your body generates energy for short, intense bursts of exercise like sprinting or fighting anaerobically, or without oxygen. When you stop exercising you still breathe heavily because your body is taking in extra oxygen to repay the oxygen debt that was incurred.  When you stop the exercise and start to recover you will actually need more oxygen to recover, and hence you breath harder than you do during the exercise. This is called Excess Post Exercise Oxygen Consumption.  Here’s why it takes more oxygen to recover:  1) You need to replace the oxygen the body needed but couldn’t get (oxygen deficit), 2) Your breathing and heart rate are elevated to remove CO2, 3) Your body temperature and metabolic rate are increased, and 4) Your Adrenaline and Noradrenaline are increased.

Here’s how Qi Gong works to decrease your recovery time.  First, to simplify the paragraph above: your body didn’t get the oxygen that it needed during the exercise and not only needs to make up for what it didn’t have during the exercise, but also needs deal with the other physiological effects that accompany short, intense bursts of exercise.  You finish the exercise and your breathing is heavy, and if you are not trained in Qi Gong, it is very inefficient. Qi Gong breathing increases the effectiveness of your breathing by doing two things: 1) increases the total volume of air moving into and out of your lungs through proper breathing, and 2) through the accompanying body motions, effectively forcing the oxygen into your circulatory system, kind of like a turbo charger on a car!

If you don’t have experience with Qi Gong breathing, here’s a brief explanation of proper form.  A single breath looks like this: 1) inhale starting at your navel – the tan tien – (newborn babies or young children after vigorous play are a great example as they the diaphragm as the main control point for breathing, ‘belly breathing’); pulling inward toward your spine to help you exhale and pushing outwards to expand your rib cage while breathing in. Actually, if you focus only on the motion and direction of your diaphragm and not directly on breathing, your lungs will fill automatically, 2) next open up your chest cavity and feel the expansion in your lungs. I’m not sure if this is scientifically proven, but in my own humble opinion, I think this increases your overall lung capacity over time and the longer practice, 3) exhale starting with your lung cavity, and press the energy downward to the tan tien. My sigung uses a great analogy to visualize this: imagine a rolling pin rolling your chest from top to bottom, 4) complete the exhale by sucking in your tan tien and pushing every last bit of oxygen out of your lungs.

The accompanying body motions are just as important as the breathing as they facilitate the flow of your vital energy and your circulatory system.  We typically perform three motions in our classes that are derived from portions of the Eight Pieces of Brocade and Shaolin Lohan Hands forms. I’ll explain one of them here.  It starts with feet shoulder width apart, knees bent and relaxed, hands at your sides, palms in front of you and facing up.  As you inhale ‘lift’ your hands up to chin level, and as you exhale, face your palms downward and ‘press’ them toward your navel.  Physically, you are forcing your rib cage to expand and accept more air during the inhale, and conversely, forcing your rib cage closed and effectively pushing the air out of your lungs during the exhale.

As you practice your Qi Gong, the next step is to focus on what’s happening to your body during the exercise and to understand where energy is flowing.  I’m just in the beginning stages of learning this, and hopefully someday I’ll learn enough to shed some light on this for other martial artists that are interested.  In the meantime, I’ve fully integrated Qi breathing into my workouts and even into my daily routines if I’m feeling low on energy.  I’m curious to know if others have the same experience with integrating Qi Gong breathing into their workouts and how their results compare to mine.

Much respect,

Mike Pollard

Pacific Wing Chun under the tutelage of Sifu Lawrence Ramirez and my Sigung Alan Bak Fu Vasquez of Orange County Wing Chun (the original)

Mike Pollard has been awarded a Black Sash at Pacific Wing Chun Kung Fu Kailua Kona, Hawaii.

Mike Pollard has been awarded a Black Sash at Pacific Wing Chun Kung Fu Association Kailua Kona, Hawaii.

Mike Pollard has been awarded a Black Sash at Pacific Wing Chun Kung Fu Association Kailua Kona, Hawaii.

Solid day of testing Chi Sao and Intercepting skill. Please congratulate Mike Pollard he has been awarded a Black Sash for his hard work and dedication in study and practice. He has the skill of a warrior and will continue his testing this month for his certification as an Instructor of Wing Chun Kung Fu.

Mike Pollard has been awarded a Black Sash at Pacific Wing Chun Kung Fu Association Kailua Kona, Hawaii.

Mike Pollard awarded Black Shirt Instructor Level at Pacific Wing Chun Kung Fu Association, Kailua Kona, Hawaii.

Mike Pollard awarded Black Shirt Instructor Level at Pacific Wing Chun Kung Fu Association, Kailua Kona, Hawaii.

Great job Mike see at this weekends session!

Aloha and Much Respect Everybody!

Motion and Wing Chun Technique Application

Motion and Wing Chun Technique Application

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The dragons are spirits of the waters. “The dragon is a kind of being whose miraculous changes are inscrutable.” In a sense the dragon is the type of a man, self-controlled, and with powers that verge upon the supernatural. In China the dragon, except as noted below, is not a power for evil, but a beneficent being producing rain and representing the fecundating principle in nature. He is the essence of the yang, or male, principle. “He controls the rain, and so holds in his power prosperity and peace.” Myths of the Waters, The Dragons, Myths and Legends of China, by Edward T.C. Werner, [1922], at sacred-texts.com

Early in my Wing Chun training, “Move like a Dragon” was an analogy my Sifu used to describe the evasive and forward, never retreating way in which a Wing Chun practitioner should forge an attack. This idea of forward motion, and constant pressure upon an opponent was fostered and cultivated in various ways every training session.

Changing direction to defuse an opponents oncoming force is one method to employ in an encounter where the oncoming force is strong and overcommitted. In these types of situations a combination of change of stance, hand technique and forward pressure can be utilized to weaken the attack and incapacitate you opponents ability to recover from his own attack.

Constant motion is inevitable in a real fight situation. There will be no staged or choreographed feed and responses from friendly training partners, there will be an ever changing enemy meaning real harm to you or your loved ones if you do not move, change and have answers to movements presented by your attacker/s. One solution, train to defuse oncoming force with change and movement, train to move and be unpredictable as possible.

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Reading or perceiving signs, movements, gestures, and signals from an opponent, advancing with ferocity to intercept and thwart forward motion then trapping limbs to destroy an opponents structure and ability to attack is the goal. The methods we use and techniques we train within the Wing Chun system show us ways to achieve this.

“The Tao of Wing Chun is a long path…” Alan Bak Fu Vasquez

 

Keep the Traditions!

lrs

 

Dedication, the Key to Understanding Wing Chun Kung Fu

Dedication, the Key to Understanding Wing Chun Kung Fu

The concepts of structured movement, economy of motion and dedication to understanding these concepts is key within the Wing Chun Kung Fu System. Wing Chun is a Martial Arts System that entails the study of body structure,  structured coordinated refined movement, and the understanding of hand and weapon form. The techniques within the system are not easily taught alone without the student having an understanding of structured movement of a body that has been trained to respond to attack with applied concepts and muscle memory trained reflexes. These are movement and concepts that are not easily learned from books or video, nor can one person transmit this knowledge to another by shear explanation alone. The practitioner has to put in the time and dedicate themselves to understanding and practice enough to be able to apply these concept competently.

From day one it usually takes a practitioner three to six months to develop enough reflex and understanding of structure to utilize some technique competently . Progress  will come to those whom are dedicated to practice, and have understanding of how to practically apply particular techniques. Many portions of the system will become second nature to the practitioner as they practice and from this practice comes muscle memory reflex in applying technique when attacked or provoked.

As more of the system is studied, the practitioner advances and is introduced to new  technique and the second and third hand forms they must also also keep in mind and adhere to basic structural and theoretic principles that are inherent to the Wing Chun System.

The Wing Chun System requires one to be dedicated in study and practice to be proficient, those whom are dedicated to practice, study and application of the system will attain a certain level of mastery.

Keep the traditions!

 

 

lrs

Pacific Wing Chun Association has a new location.

Pacific Wing Chun Association has a new location. We are moving the Kwoon into Kailua Kona from Waikoloa at the end of January. New class times and Locations! Details to follow. Contact Lawrence Ramirez Sifu for more infomation. wingchun.association@yahoo.com or pacifiwingchunassoc@live.com

Be Well and Keep the Traditions!
lrs

Happiest Holiday Wishes from Pacific Wing Kung Fu Association

Happiest Holiday Wishes too all our Friends and Wing Chun Brothers. I am Blessed to have some of the most dedicated Wing Chun, Sifu’s & Practitioner’s whom have helped to make Pacific Wing Chun Kung Fu Association what it is today. I would like to acknowledge the deepest gratitude to my Sifu Alan ‘Bak Fu” Vasquez for the gift of this art, and to Co-Sifu Eugene Tagawa for your Years of Dedication and always thoughtful generosity! Me Ke Aloha all!

Pacific Wing Chun Association Awards Scott Cannam with Honorary Black Shirt/Sash.

Scott Cannam receives Black Shirt/Sash in Kailua Kona, Hawaii.

Scott Cannam receives Black Shirt/Sash in Kailua Kona, Hawaii.

Scott Cannam receives Black Shirt/Sash from Pacific Wing Chun Association in Kailua Kona, Hawaii.

Scott Cannam receives Black Shirt/Sash from Pacific Wing Chun Association in Kailua Kona, Hawaii.

As a sign of great respect to his Sifus and Wing Chun Family, Pacific Wing Chun Association Awards Scott Cannam with Honorary Black Shirt/Sash which represents his dedication in studying Wing Chun Kung Fu, and to the great skill of the Sifus whom trained him. Scott Cannam founded the Red Deer Wing Chun group (Ving Tsun), in Alberta Canada. Scott Cannam is from the Greco Wong Kwoon in Alberta Canada. His Kwoons lineage is Yip Man / Moy Yat-Greco Wong / Kam Wong / Red Deer Wing Chun Calgary. Scott has great technique and very knowledgeable of the system and History of Wing Chun Kung Fu in general.

Thank you for sharing your skill and knowledge with us Scott. You truly are a Black Sash Kung Fu Fighter!

lrs

PACIFIC WING CHUN KUNG FU ASSOCIATION Welcomes Scott Cannam back to Kailua Kona, Hawaii.

Pacific Wing Chun Association welcomes back Scott Cannam from Red Deer Wing Chun (Ving Tsun), Alberta Canada. Scott Cannam is from the Greco Wong Kwoon in Alberta Canada. His Kwoons lineage is Yip Man / Moy Yat-Greco Wong / Kam Wong / Red Deer Wing Chun Calgary. Scott has great technique and very knowledgeable of the system. Excellent Kung Fu Scott!  Welcome Back to Kailua Kona, Hawaii and Aloha!

Scott Cannam and Eugene Tagawa Sifu at Pacific Wing Chun

Scott Cannam and Eugene Tagawa Sifu at Pacific Wing Chun

Scott Cannam and Mike Pollard work Chi Sao technique in Kailua Kona, Hawaii

Scott Cannam and Mike Pollard work Chi Sao technique in Kailua Kona, Hawaii

Be well and keep the traditions all!

Much respect lrs